welshrev

Shh! Don’t MENTION the contemporary dance!

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It’s only going to happen once in my lifetime, so I sat with the family on the settee and watched the opening ceremony of the Olympic games in that far away place known as ‘London’.

Cottages with smoking chimneys.

Very pleasant.

Forty quietly grazing sheep … that was interesting.

But smocks and milk-maid aprons … oh please!

We saw Isombard Kingdom Brunel spouting Shakespeare. We saw industrial towers (complete with steeplejacks) rising from the ground. We watched rivers of steel and saw five red hot olympic rings float over the stadium as the pastoral vision was demolished. And (masterly stroke) as things started to warm up we saw Her Majesty ‘arriving’ by helicopter with James Bond.

The world got the joke as Rowan Atkinson took on Chariots of Fire with Sir Simon Rattle … and watched a fireworks and  a light show to die for.

There was increasingly amazing music and spectacle … and 27 million people around the world tuned in to see a show that we’ll all want to remember.

Freezing out contemporary dance

After initial British scepticism … almost a national duty … the commentators are now overcome with ecstatic enthusiasm and praise.

But no-one is mentioning the contemporary dance … it hasn’t come up yet on Twitter, and you certainly can’t find it on YouTube.

Why?

The dance was amazing … brilliant, scintillating and I LOVED it. (I know, I know… but I’m a sucker for contemporary dance).

What could possibly have got it sidelined … or ‘blacked’?

Akram Khan

It was the brainchild of London-born Bangladeshi contemporary dance genius Akram Khan

… but it can’t be racism that’s surpressing public comment.

The whole show was SO politically correct.

So was it the music that caused problems?

Emeli Sande and Mahatma Gandi

Scottish singer Emeli Sande put in a moving, stirring and heart-wrenching performance.

Born to a Zambian father and Sottish mother, having written songs for Alesha Dixon, Cheryl Cole, Leona Lewis and Susan Boyle Emeli Sande is no musical lightweight!

It was a song, too, that almost everyone knows – a song that’s stood the test of considerable time. It gets sung every year at every Rugby League Challenge cup and FA cup Final since the ’20s and that features in probably 20 major films from Twilight Zone (through Dr Who) to Oliver Twist. It has appealed over the years to a huge range of people … a favourite of both King George V and of Gandhi!

So what could possibly have put it’s mention in the press and comment in the media beyond the pale of acceptability and approval?

Can you be condemned by what you approve?

Now of course it’s the case Biblically (Romans 14:22) that we should avoid being condemned because of what we approve.

So have the secular media picked up this Christian principle?

And if so why has this sidelined the scintillating talent of a London-born Bangladeshi contemporary dance genius and a British contemporary song writing legend?

Deeply, embarassingly Christian?

The problem can only be the content of the song choice.

You see that song was an old Christian hymn.

It’s ideology is deeply, Biblically Christian.

It’s content is overt – it’s unmissably about Christ and how He impacts my life and my death (just check out that powerful last verse, written 4 weeks before its author died of TB!).

And today’s silence about the piece sseems just stunning – don’t MENTION IT!

SHOCKING!

UNMENTIONABLE!

Don’t go NEAR it!

Why?

There was absolutely nothing wrong with the choreography.

There was nothing, absolutely nothing that was wrong with the singing.

The piece was thoughtful, creative, traditional and moving!

Deeply, embarassingly Christophobic?

And to my mind the commentators’ neglect of it has been deeply, embarassingly Christophobic.

To be truthful I feel sorry for the performers.

What they did was outstanding and inspiring.

And I can’t help feeling that they’re paying a ridiculous price in this ostracism of their art. Why else but that it’s content was so CHRISTIAN?!

(Psst. – if you switch on ‘privatebrowsing’, and make sure that no-one can see you, you can check out the shocking content on here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abide_with_Me)

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